A Rainy Day on the Great Ocean Road

I grew up in a town on the south-western coast of Australia. That's nearly a four-hour drive from the nearest major city (Melbourne), however, it came with the benefit of being right near the start of the Great Ocean Road, one of Australia's most popular landmarks.

Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
I often take for granted how easily I can access this amazing place as it's a bit out of the way when I'm driving between my home town (Port Fairy) and my current location (Melbourne). However, on a rainy day on the way back to Melbourne I ended up taking a detour along part of this incredible stretch of road. It had been a while since I had last visited the Twelve Apostles, so thought it would be nice to return.

Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
The Great Ocean Road doesn't really need an introduction, but for those who don't know, it's a 243 kilometre stretch of road along the south-eastern coast of Australia between the Victorian cities of Torquay and Allansford. The road traverses rainforests (look out for koalas!), as well as beaches and cliffs. The road travels via Anglesea, Lorne, Apollo Bay, and Port Campbell, the latter being famous for rock formations such as Loch Ard Gorge, London Arch and The Twelve Apostles.

Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
A word of warning, the road is incredibly windy so for those with a weak stomach (like me), make sure you come prepared with anti-nausea medication. If I don't have medication I can barely travel half an hour on this road without feeling sick.

On this particular journey, I entered the road at Allansford and had my first stop at The Bay of Martyrs. It's a gorgeous place to start, as not only is the coastline is quite dramatic, it's usually not that busy.

Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
The next stop was the London Arch, which used to be called the London Bridge until the "bridge" collapsed. This also seems like a good place to point out that despite the fact that there are signs literally everywhere along the Great Ocean Road telling you not to jump over the railing, there are always people who do so. At the London Arch, there were a couple of tourists who had jumped over the railing and walked close to the edge of the cliff to take a selfie. You would think that the signs saying "WARNING: DEATH" would stop people from wandering off the path onto the notoriously fragile cliff faces, but apparently not. Anyway. #doitforthevine

Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Shortly after the London Arch we arrived at Loch Ard Gorge, a beautiful spot with a sad history: the gorge is named after the ship Loch Ard, which ran aground on nearby Muttonbird Island on 1 June 1878 when approaching the end of a three-month journey from England to Melbourne. Of the fifty-four passengers and crew, only two survived.

Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Finally, just beyond Loch Ard Gorge were the dramatic Twelve Apostles. The rain had well and truly set in by this stage, which only served to make them look more spectacular. The Twelve Apostles are definitely the most iconic location along the Great Ocean Road, and as such you'll rarely have it to yourself. However, despite the selfie sticks, it's easy to take a moment and appreciate this incredible sight.

Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road
Twelve Apostles, Great Ocean Road


Follow me on Bloglovin / Follow me on Instagram

No comments:

Post a Comment